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How to Search

The hardest part of doing a search is having to think like a computer and not like the human you are. While one word, phrase or question may be perfectly clear when talking to another person, a computer is not capable of communicating in the same way. Follow the tips below for the best ways to communicate your search to the computer.

Searching is simple: just type what you're looking for in the search box, hit Enter or click the Search button.

Most of the time, you'll find exactly what you're looking for with just a basic, simple query (the word or phrase you search for). The following tips can help you make the most of your searches. In our examples we'll use square brackets [ ] to signal a search query.

Some basic facts

Every word matters. Generally, all the words you put in the query will be used.

Search is always case insensitive. A search for [ new york times ] is the same as a search for [ New York Times ].

Generally, punctuation is ignored, including @#$%^&*()=+[]\ and other special characters.

To make sure that your Google searches return the most relevant results, there are some exceptions to the rules above.

Tips for better searches
Keep it simple. If you're looking for a particular company, just enter its name, or as much of its name as you can recall. If you're looking for a particular concept, place, or product, start with its name. If you're looking for a pizza restaurant, just enter pizza and the name of your town or your zip code. Most queries do not require advanced operators or unusual syntax. Simple is good.

Think how the page you are looking for will be written. A search engine is not a human, it is a program that matches the words you give to pages on the web. Use the words that are most likely to appear on the page. For example, instead of saying [ my head hurts ], say [ headache ], because that's the term a medical page will use. The query [ in what country are bats considered an omen of good luck? ] is very clear to a person, but the document that gives the answer may not have those words. Instead, use the query [ bats are considered good luck in ] or even just [ bats good luck ], because that is probably what the right page will say.

Describe what you need with as few terms as possible. The goal of each word in a query is to focus it further. Since all words are used, each additional word limits the results. If you limit too much, you will miss a lot of useful information. The main advantage to starting with fewer keywords is that, if you don't get what you need, the results will likely give you a good indication of what additional words are needed to refine your results on the next search. For example, [ weather cancun ] is a simple way to find the weather and it is likely to give better results than the longer [ weather report for cancun mexico ].

Choose descriptive words. The more unique the word is the more likely you are to get relevant results. Words that are not very descriptive, like 'document,' 'website,' 'company,' or 'info,' are usually not needed. Keep in mind, however, that even if the word has the correct meaning but it is not the one most people use, it may not match the pages you need. For example, [ celebrity ringtones ] is more descriptive and specific than [ celebrity sounds ].

When a Basic Search Isn't Enough
Click here for more information on Advanced Search from Google.

Exceptions
Search is rarely absolute. Search engines use a variety of techniques to imitate how people think and to approximate their behavior. As a result, most rules have exceptions. For example, the query [ for better or for worse ] will not be interpreted by Google as an OR query, but as a phrase that matches a (very popular) comic strip. Google will show calculator results for the query [ 34 * 87 ] rather than use the 'Fill in the blanks' operator. Both cases follow the obvious intent of the query.

Click here for more information on Search Exceptions from Google.

Information provided in this article is © Google 2010

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